Forum Posts

Jim Gillogly
Oct 20, 2020
In Membership
https://i9peu1ikn3a16vg4e45rqi17-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/522-025-Unit-Roadmap-Final.pdf The BSA has put together a great resource for starting, maintaining and growing units. Check it out. The purpose of the Unit Roadmap is to help simplify the tasks for having successful units. BSA professionals, charter organizations and volunteers work together to foster the unit through different phases a Scout unit might be experiencing. The Unit Roadmap should be laid out to address the 3 phases of long-term unit success: starting, sustaining and growing. This guide is intended to be a centralized source that will be found in an online version for quick reference for both BSA professionals and volunteers to access. Many resources are already available to support units and can be referenced through links to these documents. The guide should serve as easy, overarching tips to start, sustain and grow units.
0
0
2
Jim Gillogly
Sep 15, 2020
In General Discussions
Flat Juan and Flat Juanita were mentioned at the recent WickedAwesomeNED Roundtable. Here they are for your fun!
Flat Juan and Flat Juanita content media
0
0
6
Jim Gillogly
Jun 11, 2020
In Camp Food
There is a great YouTube resource for camp recipes. Scouter Karl, continuing his Wood Badge ticket, is adding weekly camp recipes videos that feature popular camp foods. The videos are detailed, entertaining, and are gear directly for patrol cooking. He even includes tips for packaging and cleanup. check out the nom noms: https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCfjG-0gqB5HyV4St_fH3qsQ
Scouter Karl shares his camp recipes  content media
0
1
4
Jim Gillogly
Apr 15, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
The BSA has updated its FAQ on COVID-19, answering many common questions. The FAQ includes discussions on - In-Person Unit Activities - Camping this Summer - Advancement - Advancement — Cub Scouts - Advancement — Scouts BSA, Venturing and Sea Scouts Updates are marked in the page, and many advancement and camping areas have seen changes. The FAQ on COVID-19 is here. For questions not answered by the COVID-19 FAQ, please email Program.development@scouting.org
0
0
5
Jim Gillogly
Apr 15, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
The BSA has a site devoted to BSA Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activity Guidelines. These detail how to keep members safe in online activities - particularly in the COV-19 environment. BSA Digital Safety and Online Scouting Activities site here UMMARY As Scouting moves to virtual and online platforms, we offer the following reminders to help keep kids safe. The below guidance applies to all online Scouting activities and meetings. Note: Some states may have legal requirements that differ from, and even go beyond, what is provided here. It is your responsibility to check and abide by your state laws and consult your local council when reviewing and applying the following guidance, which is not comprehensive. GENERAL INFORMATION Follow all youth protection policies.All youth protection policies still apply in an online environment. Ensure you always have two-deep leadership for online activities and meetings. Our ban on one-on-one contact between an adult leader and youth applies to all interactions ­– whether in person, online, through a web conference, over the phone, via text, or in any other form. All aspects of the Scouting program are open to observation by parents, and the BSA suggests parents take part in online activities and meetings. Use business-oriented conference platforms instead of platforms with other primary purposes (such as gaming).Examples of business-oriented conference platforms: Zoom, Skype, GoToMeeting. Examples of platforms that are not recommended: Discord, Roblox, and Twitch. Please review the terms of service, safety and privacy features, and data collection policies of any platform you use, and review the BSA Digital Privacy and Social Media Guidelines linked below. Do not record online activities/meetingsCall recording is subject to various legal requirements under U.S. law and the laws of individual states, some of which require all parties to a call consent to recording. Considering those potential regulatory risks, the BSA does not authorize the recording of online meetings/activities. Safeguard personal information.If you collect a person’s personal information online—for example, through web forms used to register people for online meetings—then you should post a notice or disclosure at the point of collection describing how you will use the information. The notice should be conspicuous and written in plain English. Meeting organizers must keep such information private and not share a youth’s personal information with anyone except that youth’s parent or guardian or the unit leader responsible for tracking advancements. For example, a merit badge counselor should not publicly post or otherwise show a roster with personal information of Scouts the counselor has worked with. Collecting personal information from youth under 13 is not recommended.Do not collect personal information directly from youth under 13 years of age due to the parental notice and consent requirements under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (“COPPA”). You should collect any data needed from the parent or legal guardian only.
0
0
5
Jim Gillogly
Apr 01, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
(Source: Narragansett Council) *Important update for completing the Arrow of Light requirements.* The question has come up for those fifth grade dens working on Arrow of Light who have not visited a Troop or attended a Troop outing to function as a patrol, how do we complete these two requirements? Two things to keep in mind, the standard of completion for Cub Scout advancement is "Do Your Best" so given the circumstances we want to look at the purpose behind the requirements. Remember that doing nothing is never doing your best. Dens can visit a virtual Troop meeting to see the patrol method and youth leadership in action. Since the den can not attend a Troop camp out or outing the idea is for the den to attend the activity and function as a patrol. During this time a virtual den meeting where the den functions as a patrol can be done. Elect a patrol leader, pick a patrol name, play a virtual game together as a patrol. Plenty of opportunities to Do Your Best to meet the intention of the requirement. #WickedAwesomeScouts #ScoutMeIn #CubScouts #ArrowOfLight #Webelos #NCBSA #BoyScoutsOfAmerica
Arrow of Light Requirements content media
1
0
1
Jim Gillogly
Mar 26, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
See the excellent post from Bryan on Scouting about how to conduct a remote Board of Review We have already seen a couple BoRs in our district. Tell us how they went! Any tips?
1
0
8
Jim Gillogly
Mar 25, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
Let's put our ideas down here! With all of the unit meetings cancelled, what have you done to keep Scouting running under current restrictions? Got any good resources? Let's let everyone know! Just add to the discussion...
0
3
14
Jim Gillogly
Mar 24, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
The BSA has issued a statement on COVID-19 & Scouting. Please read the important notice here. Please visit this link often for updates. Additional resources are available at that link (https://www.scouting.org/coronavirus/to help units with scouting resources. - FAQ Section (discussion on meetigs & advancement): https://www.scouting.org/coronavirus/covid-19-faq/ - Scouting at Home: https://www.scouting.org/coronavirus/ - FAQ Section (discussion on meetings & advancement): As always, remember to observe proper YPT practices with any remote Scouting activities!
1
0
8
Jim Gillogly
Mar 24, 2020
In Coronovirus Discussions
I'm sure everyone has questions about how advancement will be handled through this time. The BSA National Council's Advancement Committee has given guidelines in the following file. The guidelines discuss advancement processes for all BSA programs, including remote processes, Eagle Scout applications and how to handle "deadlines" for Cub Scout ranks. We will continue to update this information, as needed , they must not be held to expectations that are impossible to fulfill. See GTA Topic 4.2.3.4, “Positions of Responsibility,” with its six subtopics. Text follows: Questions and Answers Cub Scouting/Scouts BSA/Venturing/Sea Scouting Rank Advancement and the Coronavirus (COVID-19) The following questions regarding advancement have arisen as we deal with closures, cancellations, or other issues caused by the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19). Although there are difficulties and constraints, advancement can continue. Youth, parents, and leaders should work together to implement creative, common sense ways to facilitate advancement while adhering to the Guide to Safe Scouting and following the rules of Youth Protection training. Please follow this link to the Guide to Advancement (GTA), which remains the primary source for information related to Scouts BSA advancement. It is referenced throughout the answers provided here. Please send additional questions to advancement.team@scouting.org All Scouting Programs Q: How can advancement be tracked remotely? A: Scouting units should use ScoutBook to record and track advancement. To track advancement remotely, parents should: 1) Connect with their child’s member profile via an invitation that the unit leader sends within ScoutBook. 2) Once a connection is made, the parent should use the Scouting app, found in both the App Store and Google Play, to stay connected with their unit. 3) The Scouting app provides parents the ability to report any advancement that was completed at home. Go to https://help.scoutbook.com to learn more about how to start using ScoutBook and how to connect parents to their Scouts. Cub Scouts Q: May parents sign off on Webelos and Arrow of Light requirements? A: Yes. Through July 31, 2020, parents and other adults in the Cub Scout’s family, may sign off on Webelos and Arrow of Light requirements. We strongly encourage that parents use the Scouting App or ScoutBook to record completion of their child’s requirements. Q: If my den is behind in advancement due to COVID-19, can my Cub Scout continue to work on advancement through the summer? A: Yes. Cub Scouts can continue to work on their current den’s advancement through July 31, 2020. This is to provide any additional time a Cub Scout needs to complete their badge of rank; if they earn their badge of rank prior to July 31, 2020, they may advance to the next rank. Scouts BSA, Venturing and Sea Scouts Q: May merit badge requirements or rank requirements be modified? A: No. All requirements must be completed as written. If meetings or activities are canceled or limited, youth should continue to work on requirements as far as possible. By employing common sense and creative solutions, many requirements–even Scoutmaster conferences–can be fulfilled through videoconferencing or telephone calls. Q: Can merit badge counseling or Nova/Supernova counseling be done using digital technologies like Zoom or WebEx? A: Yes, registered merit badge counselors or Nova counselors/Supernova mentors may work with youth using digital platforms, ensuring that all youth protection measures noted in the Guide to Safe Scouting and BSA’s social media guidelines are in place. In addition to youth protection, the advancement guidelines in GTA Section 7 are required. Q: May time missed due to canceled unit meetings count toward active participation requirements? A: Yes. If youth are registered and in good standing, a disruption from COVID-19 virus can be the “noteworthy circumstance” that prevents participation. This policy has been in place for many years and is explained in GTA Topic 4.2.3.1. Q: May time missed due to canceled unit meetings count toward position of responsibility requirements? A: Yes. If youth are registered and unable to meet the expectations of their positions because of COVID-19 disruptions, then units may need to waive or rethink the expectations. Just as youth must not be held to unestablishedexpectations, they must not be held to expectations that are impossible to fulfill. See GTA Topic 4.2.3.4, “Positions of Responsibility,” with its six subtopics. Q: Does the National Council grant extensions of time to complete rank requirements beyond the 18th birthday for the Eagle or 21st birthday for Summit or Quartermaster? A: Yes, but only for the Eagle Scout rank as described in GTA Topic 9.0.4.0 or for Venturing Summit or Sea Scout Quartermaster as described in GTA Topic 4.3.3.0. Unit leadership must become familiar with the five tests under 9.0.4.0. The tests were designed to accommodate such obstacles as those presented by COVID-19 disruptions. Q: Will youth who are not yet Life Scouts be allowed to apply for an extension to earn the Eagle Scout rank? A. Extensions are considered only for Scouts who are Life rank. If, once a Scout achieves Life rank, it turns out that COVID-19 disruptions along the way have left them with insufficient time to complete Eagle requirements, then this may be cited when the time comes to submit an extension request. Q: May local councils grant extensions? A: Normally, that is not allowed. However, due to the current situation—effective immediately and through September 30, 2020—council Scout executives may grant extensions, or delegate authority to the Council Advancement Committee to grant extensions under the following limitations: 1. It can be established that COVID-19 disruptions were the only circumstances that delayed work on Eagle Scout/Summit/Quartermaster advancement requirements, such as the service project or merit badges. If any other causes were involved, the extension request must go to the National Council following the process outlined in the GTA. 2. Extensions shall only be granted to youth in Scouts BSA who have already achieved Life rank. 3. When the council receives a COVID-19-related request for a time extension, the council reviews the request and approves it if appropriate. A written response stating the outcome of the extension request must go to the youth. If approved, the notification must be attached to the youth’s Eagle/Summit/Quartermaster rank application. For Eagle, the extension must not exceed 3 months from the youth’s 18thbirthday; for Summit/Quartermaster, the extension must not exceed 3 months from the youth’s 21st birthday. 4. Upon turning 18, the Scout must submit a completed adult application and successfully complete YPT; their participant code will now be UP for SBSA or VP for Venturing and Sea Scouting. 5. Extension requests for more than 3 months beyond the youth’s 18th/21stbirthday must be sent to the National Service Center following the process outlined in the GTA. Note: A “month” in BSA advancement is defined as a day from one month to the next. For example, March 5 to April 5. The authority for councils to grant extensions is temporary, lasting only through Sept. 30, 2020. Q: If youth have already received an extension, can they request additional time due to COVID-19? A: Yes. Council Scout executives may grant extensions, or delegate authority to the Council Advancement Committee to grant extensions under the limitations listed above. Q: What should be done while an extension request is being considered? A: Youth should continue to work on advancement in so far as they are able—e.g., independently, or over the phone or videoconference—and at Scouting activities once they resume. Q: Are extensions required when an Eagle/Summit/Quartermaster board of review must be delayed? A: No. Councils may grant Eagle/Summit/Quartermaster boards of review up to six months after the youth’s 18th/21stbirthday. See GTA Topic 8.0.3.1, “Eagle Scout Board of Review Beyond the 18th Birthday.” See also, GTA Topic 8.0.1.6, “Boards of Review Through Videoconferencing.” Q: Are electronic or digital signatures acceptable for rank advancement or for the Eagle/Summit/Quartermaster packets/applications? A: Yes. Electronic or digital signatures will be accepted through September 30, 2020. Q: How can a youth continue to work on advancement requirements if they don’t have internet or high-speed internet for videoconferencing? A: Youth may take a picture of their completed activity/requirement and share the work with unit leaders. In keeping with Youth Protection Training policies, all communications from youth should be sent to at least two adults. Parents or guardians may send advancement work on behalf of their child.
BSA notice on Advancement thru COVID-19 crisis content media
1
1
6
Jim Gillogly
Feb 14, 2020
In Membership
You've just gotten a new cub in your den, but it's February. How do you integrate this bright young scout into your den? What do you do about advancement? You want this cub to succeed, and have fun (and keep with the program, too) but the advancement seems to get in the way. Thoughts?
0
0
2
Jim Gillogly
Feb 12, 2020
In General Camping
The BSA has a great resource for anyone interested in the different Regions and Areas of the BSA - Region and Area Maps. For those of you wondering, NED is located in the Northeast Region, Area 1. Not only are these maps a great way to see how the BSA is structured, but they also show camps in the areas! All parts of the US are covered Now, that is a great planning tool for PLCs and others planning trips! Click the link below to access all the available maps. Region and Area Maps Here is our map (in both pdf and png. You'll want the pdf version to see details, but the png gives a good overview. Keep in mind, NE Regions Area 2 and 3 are, also, within easy driving distance of our units. So, why not pass this along to your scouts at their next planning activity, so they can build new adventures by visiting a new place!
I'm the map. I'm the map... Maps of BSA Regions/Areas content media
0
0
1
Jim Gillogly
Nov 14, 2019
In General Camping
We want to hear from you about your favorite winter camping tips. Here are a few to get us started: For a quick warmup, try a mug of warm jello (yes, you heard right). It's a great way to quickly warm your scouts, and lift lift spirits, especially, once that warm, sugary, yummy, stick-to-your-ribs liquid hits. It's yummy, too. Added benefit - if it chills, you have, well, jello. Make sure you have a good, closed cell sleeping pad under you. Air pads will keep you cold. You'll want as much insulation under you as possible. Double up for even more protection. The ground is a great heatsink, and will draw all the warmth out of you without it. Many loose layers!!! Layers are better at keeping you warm. Keep them loose, so that air (warmed by you) can get between them If you have a knife, get a lanyard on it! That way, if you drop it in the leaves or snow, you won't have to wait till spring to collect it. Keep you boots and change of clothes in your sleeping bag in cold weather. Put them in a plastic bag to protect your sleeping bag, and store them at the foot of your bag. They will stay nice and warm (& won't freeze solid) for the morning Always change your clothes (especially socks!) right before hitting the sleeping bag for the night. Moisture from many thing (including you) will keep you cold. A new, dry layer will help you sleep warmer. Don't hide your head in the sleeping bag to stay warm. Moisture from your breath will make your bag colder (despite the immediate relief you might find. Instead, sleep with a hat (&, maybe a balaclava). Cotton is rotten! Keep away from the moisture-loving cotton. It will trap dampness, and will make you cold. Stick with synthetics or wool, when camping in the cold. Coton socks are the worst culprit here. Try sock liners to keep your feet warm. No need for disposable warmers. These synthetic liners wick the moisture away from your foot, keeping your toosties toasty. Your turn!
Winter Camping Tips? content media
0
0
19
Jim Gillogly
Oct 31, 2019
In History
The 1940 edition of the Scout Handbook has a wealth of information. The authors even tried to list all the uses for a Scout neckerchief. They came up with 56 different uses. Can you think of more? Notes: 1. We advise against using #12 and #13 on the "Scouting" section, except in extreme emergencies, nowadays. 2. In case you don't know what a "tump" line is (#9 in the Triangular Bandages seciton) , you just have to use your head. 3. We also advise against getting into a boat that requires #7 (Scouting section). :)
56 Uses for a Scout Neckerchief content media
0
0
3
Jim Gillogly
Oct 31, 2019
In Youth Awards
Do you enjoy camping under the stars, rafting a whitewater river, or hitting the trail afoot, on a bike, or even on a horse? Can you pitch a tent, find your way, and bandage an ankle using only materials in your pack? Are you prepared to do any of these in rain, snow, sleet, or heat? If so, the National Outdoor Awards are for you. There is nothing virtual about these awards—you can earn them only by demonstrating knowledge and experience in the outdoors The award consists of five emblem segments positioned around a center emblem. he segments represent five areas of emphasis: Riding, Hiking, Camping, Aquatics, and Adventure.  This is no give-away award. It takes some hard work to earn each segment.  You could be one of a handful in our council to get it!  The good news is that most Scouts are already on their way to earning segments - just by doing what Scouts do!  It just takes a little extra effort, and you can rock this cool award. Check out the requirements at the Scouting.org website.
National Outdoor Awards (Scouts BSA) content media
0
0
5
Jim Gillogly
Oct 31, 2019
In Camp Food
This is a game changer! If you have access to ice and some basic ingredients, you can make ice cream in just a few minutes - while you camp! It's a great way to keep you scouts busy, fed and happy (It also goes really good with a bunch of dutch oven desserts - pie, dump cake, brownies,,,). Notes: If you are at a scout camp, the dining hall may have plenty of ice for you to use Try adding in flavorings: Chocolate syrup, frozen fruit and squeeze toppings work well.
Homemade Ice Cream at Camp?!?! content media
0
0
2
Jim Gillogly
Oct 21, 2019
In General Discussions
Okay, let’s hear all about your favorite video-based sites for getting Scouting information! Anything that might be applicable (and is Scouting appropriate) Is on the table. Games, Scout Skills, Training, etc. Let’s hear about it! Here are a few to get started: Troop Leader: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCEmQR5W4PkcSLfLV96SOH7w Narragansett Council: https://www.youtube.com/user/NCBSA Duct Tape team building skills: https://www.youtube.com/user/coachtomheck BSA communications: https://www.youtube.com/user/BSAIntComm Paracord Guild: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4rnzGLwsvy2UDnKi2-V-OQ Scoutmaster Dave: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprqarEufB7dGfgIQBXJHkw now it’s your turn...
0
0
15
Jim Gillogly
Oct 10, 2019
In General Discussions
For those of you who rely on spell checker to get to the Council’s website... Why spell out www.narragansettbsa.org , when you can get to the same site by typing ncbsa.org? A scout is thrifty, after all. 😁
0
0
6
Jim Gillogly
Oct 08, 2019
In Training
There are three courses, ILST, ILSC and ILSS, designed for unit leaders to train their youth leaders in basic leadership. The courses, built for Troops, Crews or Ships, give youth the basic tools to lead their program in their unit. Youth will learn the structure of their unit, what their roles are in the unit structure (i.e., what each position of responsibility does) and gives them a basic toolkit for leadership. These courses are designed as the first step in the BSA's training continuum for youth, and provide the foundation for more advanced courses in leadership, such as National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) and National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE) The courses are designed to be run by the unit leader (i.e., Scoutmaster, Crew Advisor, Skipper) for their unit's youth. Each syllabus provides a framework for running the course, and is tailorable to the unit's specific structure and needs. Introduction to Leadership Skills for Troops (ILST) The purpose of the ILST course is to teach Scouts with leadership positions about their new roles and how to most effectively reach success in that role. It is intended to help Scouts in leadership positions within their troop understand their responsibilities and to equip them with organizational and leadership skills to fulfill those responsibilities. ILST is the first course in the series of leadership training offered to Scouts and is a replacement for Troop Leadership Training. Completion of ILST is a prerequisite for Scouts to participate in the more advanced leadership courses National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) and the National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE). It is also required to participate in a Kodiak Challenge Trek. The syllabus is available here. Introduction to Leadership Skills for Crews (ILSC) The purpose of the Introduction to Leadership Skills for Crews course is to teach crew members with leadership positions about their new roles and how to most effectively reach success in that role. It is intended to help Venturers in leadership positions within their crew understand their responsibilities and to equip them with organizational and leadership skills to fulfill those responsibilities. Introduction to Leadership Skills for Crews is the first course in the series of leadership training offered to Venturers and is a replacement for the Venturing Leadership Skills Course. Completion of Introduction to Leadership Skills for Crews is a prerequisite for Venturers to participate in the more advanced leadership courses National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT) and the National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE). It is also required for Kodiak. The syllabus is available here Introduction to Leadership Skills for Ships (ILSS) ILSS is intended to help Sea Scouts in leadership positions within their ship understand their responsibilities and to equip them with organizational and leadership skills to fulfill those responsibilities. ILSS replaces the Venturing Leadership Skills Course (VLSC) and is a prerequisite for Sea Scouts to participate in the more advanced leadership courses (i.e., National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience (NAYLE) and the Kodiak Challenge). The syllabus is available here.
0
0
2
Jim Gillogly
Sep 24, 2019
In General Discussions
The Bryan on Scouting blog, the official blog of Scouting Magazine, has pointed out three new resources to help Cub Leaders. There are: New Welcome Tools (Welcome New Family/New Den Leader/ New Position-Specific Guides New online resources for families researching Cub Scouting New resources for recruiting Cub Scout leaders You can find the article and the resources here
0
0
5

Jim Gillogly

Admin
More actions